Tag Archives: Maine

Long Term I-95 Ramp Closure in Maine Scheduled to Begin Tuesday

The I-95 Exit 1 northbound off ramp closure that was scheduled to begin last Wednesday has been rescheduled. The closure is now scheduled to occur beginning at 12:01 a.m. on Tuesday, March 27, 2018. The ramp, located in Kittery, will be closed in order to perform repairs to the Dennett Road overpass bridge along the Maine Turnpike. The Exit 1 northbound ramp is expected to be closed until June 22, 2018. The closure is necessary during construction in order to preserve public safety by maintaining three lanes of traffic in each direction on the mainline of the Turnpike.

VMS Boards and detour signs will be in place during the closure. The Exit 1 southbound on ramp will also be closed for up to 28 days beginning in mid-May. More information will be provided pertaining to the southbound closure once the details are more defined.

“We are working to ensure that Exit 1 is reopened before we get into the month of July and traffic volume from tourists picks up,” said MTA spokesperson Erin Courtney. “It was better for us to do the work this spring and get out before summer traffic explodes.”

During the closures, construction crews will perform bridge repairs and modifications to the Dennett Road Overpass Bridge.


For more I-95 construction info, visit  www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to I-95, America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida! Plus I-95 construction, real-time traffic and road news.

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.

Yet Another Coastal Storm for East Coast I-95 Travelers

The third coastal storm in 2 weeks is poised to bring gusty winds, minor coastal flooding, and areas of snow, heaviest in New England.

After the precipitation ends in the Mid-Atlantic region Monday night, attention turns to New England as the third nor’easter in two weeks is expected to bring significant snow from Connecticut to Maine, with some locations possibly getting in excess of a foot of snow. Parts of upstate New York are also likely to get heavy snow through the middle of the week. With the forecast track of the storm expected to be farther southeast than the last two events, the highest winds and waves should remain over the offshore waters.

Winter Storm Warnings have been issued for all of southern New England.

Snow will begin after midnight with heavier snow and near-blizzard conditions Tuesday morning lasting into the afternoon.

Potential for 1″ to 3″ of snow per hour, combined with high winds, could lead to near impossible travel conditions around Tuesday morning and even the Tuesday afternoon commute.


For more I-95 travel info, visit  www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to I-95, America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida! Plus I-95 construction, real-time traffic and road news.

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.

Weekend Snow Storm Threat Brewing

A fast moving weather system will likely bring accumulating snow to portions of the Mid Atlantic and Northeast Saturday and Sunday. While not expected to be a blockbuster, the possibility of up to 6 inches of snow along the I-95 corridor is likely.

This storm will see accumulating snow from West Virginia to southern Maine, and will occur from Saturday afternoon into Sunday morning. During the height of the storm snow may accumulate up to an inch per hour for several hours.

I-95 travelers will see wet to slushy to snow-covered pavement this weekend. From New Jersey to New York City, 1-3 inches of snow is forecast. Connecticut and Rhode Island will see 2-4 inches while the Boston area is expected to see up to 6 inches of snow. Snowfall amounts will taper off  in New Hampshire and Maine.


For more I-95 travel info, visit  www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to I-95, America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida! Plus I-95 construction, real-time traffic and road news.

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.

 

Maine Rings In the Winter Recreational Season With More Than A Foot Of Snow

As Bob and Doug would say, “So, like take off to the Great White North”.

This past week marked the official start of the Maine Office of Tourism’s weekly snow reports, sent in collaboration with Ski Maine Association and the Maine Snowmobile Association (MSA). The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) snow depth map shows the majority of Maine has between 18 and 24 inches. The coastal regions show less snow, while areas in the Maine Highlands region and Aroostook County show up to two feet or more.

According to a Bangor Daily News article, the Christmas day storm left more than a foot of snow covering much of the state, with heavy winds contributing to near whiteout conditions and snow drifts.

Christmas vacation week presents a busy time at ski centers throughout the state. Mt. Abram will host a variety of activities that range from beer tastings to a family ski race and après celebration. At Shawnee Peak in Bridgton, their Winter Festival will take place and feature equipment demos and open mic nights. Live music, movie nights and a New Year’s Eve celebration with fireworks and live music will be happening at Sugarloaf. In Newry at Sunday River, there is fun for the whole family including dining with Eddy the Yeti at North Peak, River Nugget Jam and New Year’s Eve fireworks. For the first time ever, Lost Valley was able to open their entire terrain for Christmas week.

“Every ski center in the state, both alpine and Nordic, has spectacular conditions with some areas reporting up to 22 inches in the last week,” said Greg Sweetser, Ski Maine’s executive director. “Many areas are operating on vacation week hours, so it’s a great week to hit the slopes.”

To celebrate the start of 2018, Farmington’s Titcomb Mountain will be running their Tour de Titcomb with a Classic Sprint and Hill Climb.

For snowmobilers, MSA Executive Director Bob Meyers said, “This winter’s snowmobile season is shaping up exceedingly well, with ample snow depth across most areas of the state and with cold temperatures helping to create a solid trail base.”

There are snowmobile trails groomed and ready throughout Maine. Some trails with excellent conditions include: Limestone, known as the “Border Trail” from Limestone to Van Buren; Coburn, between The Forks and Jackman; Madawaska, with a clubhouse occasionally open and serving chicken stew and ploys; and East Kennebago 1 and 2, with views from the summit of East Kennebago Mountain in Rangeley.

The MSA snowmobile trail conditions page went live on the website yesterday, and will be updated daily throughout the season. As a special caution for the coming week, some regions of the state are expected to experience an extended period of cold weather, especially in the Caribou area where there are warnings of a dangerous wind chill of negative 20 to 30 degrees during the day.

“Take it easy, bundle up and be sure your gear is in good working order if you venture out,” said Meyers. “Be smart and safe. Now is not a good time to end up having to walk!”

“We’re thrilled to see a lot of fresh snow covering much of Maine as we get ready to kick off the new year,” said Maine Office of Tourism’s senior tourism officer, Phil Savignano. “This season’s ski and snowmobiling season appears to be promising, and we also look forward to a winter filled with other outdoor activities and events. With Maine’s size and varied geography, keep in mind there is always good snow somewhere in Maine even if it’s not in your backyard.”

For weekend plans, bundle up to go ice skating at The Rink at Thompson’s Point, or for Nordic skiers and snowshoers, Pineland Farms of New Gloucester has freshly groomed trails and loops and to warm up at the end of the day, a kitchen and deli serving soups, salads and sandwiches. Get out of the cold by checking out one of Maine’s farmers markets in Portland or Brunswick, both open Saturdays.

The snow reports will be released each Wednesday throughout the season. Visitors can also find information about other winter activities and events on VisitMaine.com.


For more I-95 travel info, visit  www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to I-95, America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida! Plus I-95 construction, real-time traffic and road news.

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.

Maine Turnpike Turns 70

The Maine Turnpike Authority will celebrate the 70th anniversary of the opening of the Maine Turnpike’s first phase, the 47-mile, Kittery-to-Portland superhighway on December 13. Before the Maine Turnpike opened on December 13, 1947, it could take half a day to drive from Portland to Kittery. After the Turnpike opened, only 47 minutes.

What began as a vision shared by Maine legislators in 1940 and was then delayed by America’s entry into World War II, became a reality in 1947 as the Maine Turnpike debuted as the nation’s second superhighway and immediately set a number of historic firsts.

  • Maine’s first mile-a-minute highway
    The Turnpike was Maine’s first roadway with a posted 60 mph speed limit. Few New Englanders in 1947 had ever driven that fast.
  • New England’s first and only the nation’s second superhighway
    The first section of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, defined as a superhighway for its double two-lane limited access roadways separated by a wide median strip, opened in 1940. The Maine Turnpike was America’s second modern superhighway.
  • America’s first toll highway to pay its own way
    The Maine Turnpike was financed completely with the issue of revenue bonds purchased by investors and repaid from toll collections. In seven decades, tolls have paid for all of the Turnpike’s maintenance and improvements without ever having to rely on state or federal funding.
  • America’s first asphalt superhighway
    Some experts say that the Maine Turnpike was the first highway in the world to be built entirely with asphalt. Concrete was considered the only way to go before Maine’s superhighway set the new standard.

The original smooth, straight stretch of roadway proved to be such a popular success, that in 1953 the Turnpike Authority sought to extend the pike northward. On December 13, 1956, the 66-mile, Portland-to-Gardiner extension, including the four-mile Falmouth spur, was added to the state’s transportation infrastructure.

Seventy years later, the Maine Turnpike continues to be a proving ground for new highway engineering, construction, and technological advancement. In recent years, the Maine Turnpike Authority has added Open Road Tolling systems that process electronic EZPass transactions as drivers cruise through at highway speeds. On-ramp and off-ramp configurations have been upgraded with newer, safer designs. Last year, the Lewiston exit was rebuilt with the state’s first Single Point Urban Interchange, a design developed to move large volumes of traffic more safely and efficiently within a limited space.


For more I-95 travel info, visit  www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to I-95, America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida! Plus I-95 construction, real-time traffic and road news.

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.

I-95 the 5th Most Dangerous Interstate in the Country

The U.S. Department of Transportation reports that traffic fatalities have increased 10.4 percent during the first six months of 2016 compared to the same time period in 2015.  These increases are most likely the result of more drivers on the road and a greater percentage of these motorists are driving distracted. A recent study found that 61 percent of drivers use their cell phones on some drives, most drives or every drive.

On average, Americans spend 293 hours driving approximately 10,900 miles each year. A detailed study by EverQuote examined the most dangerous interstates in America, based on fatalities per mile. This analysis used raw data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fatality Analysis Report System from 2010 through 2015 and found fatality rates based on highway lengths.
That data was then compared to the data from EverQuote’s safe-driving app, EverDrive, representing over 6 million trips and 80 million miles of driving.

That study ranked Interstate 95 the 5th most deadly highway in America.

Interstate 95 runs 1926 miles from Miami, Florida to Houlton, Maine. The highway is the 5th most dangerous interstate in the United States with 0.89 fatalities per mile. It has been in the top 10 for fatalities each year for the past six years.


For more I-95 travel info, visit www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida!

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.

Temporary I-95 Ramps Opening in Maine

The Maine Department of Transportation reports that the new access points to Whitten Road will be used by all traffic taking I-95 to points south of Augusta and for those on I-95 southbound headed east towards downtown Augusta or the Capital Area.

Exit 109B will remain available for all I-95 southbound traffic headed west towards Manchester/Winthrop.

The southbound traffic pattern on Whitten Road remains the same. However, all northbound traffic on Whitten Road will encounter a new stop sign at the intersection of Whitten Road and the temporary southbound on ramp

Motorists should all extra time or consider using alternate routes such as Exit 112 or 113

Maine DOT is replacing a damaged overpass at the 109A interchange spanning I-95. The new bridge is expected to open later this winter.

Construction is weather dependent, so schedules are subject to change.


For more I-95 construction info, visit www.i95exitguide.com, the Internet’s largest and most complete website devoted to America’s Interstate Main Street. Detailed exit service listings… discount lodging, camping, food, gas and more for every exit from Maine to Florida!

Traveling another route? Visit our growing family of exit guides: I-4 Exit GuideI-5 Exit Guide,  I-10 Exit Guide , and I-75 Exit Guide.